5 Things to Consider While Building a Remote Legal Team

The immense growth of online productivity tools and the emergence of virtual office culture are breaking down the traditional geographical barriers. The latest technological advancements allow businesses to become distributed and operate efficiently from anywhere in the world. Moreover, when an existing in-house team is overburdened, building a remote team always becomes a suitable option for most businesses. Setting up and managing remote teams, however, entails multiple challenges. If you’ve been planning to build a remote legal team, it is always important to consider a few factors to ensure that your remote legal team functions optimally.

Here are 5 things to consider while building a remote legal team:

1. Comprehend Legal Issues

While hiring a remote team, it is always better to actually comprehend the job you intend to hire someone for. When you need lawyers for intellectual property, it is important to determine the kind of risks you will be exposed to in the IP space. Similarly, if you are into content business, you might decide to build a remote team with in-depth experience in copyright laws.

2. Draft Accurate Work Description

Once you have comprehended your specific requirements, it is always important to craft an accurate work description. While creating a job description, make sure that you include the details of the expected work. For better understanding, it is always advisable to provide a more elaborate description about the culture and vibe of your company. Last but not the least, specify the must-have requirements for candidates such as expected skills and the level of required experience. Apart from simply attracting candidates, an accurate work description also helps prospective candidates decide quickly whether your company is the ideal one that they wish to work for.

3. Select Candidates with Soft Skills

Identifying a great lawyer goes much beyond finding someone with proper technical expertise. In virtual teams, lawyers need to perform as a part of a team and under pressure at that. While interviewing prospective lawyers, consider how collaborative the lawyers are and how they function in high-stake situations. Also, ensure whether a candidate has immense judgment skills or not.

4. Ensure Consistent Communication

The moment you have the right team, it is important to facilitate consistent and effective communication. Facilitating constant communication is the biggest challenge faced by managers who build a virtual team. It is important to remember that each team member may be highly productive but when there is no productive communication, business efficiency may be hampered. For choosing the right communication, it is important to choose the perfect software. Once you select the perfect tools, make sure that you conduct regular virtual meetings to track the status and progress of the team.

5. Establish Team Culture

When you are hiring virtual lawyers, it is important that the team members share the vision and mission of the company. Only when you share your business goals will your team members feel that they are a part of the business growth and this is definitely an important motivating factor in virtual teams.

It can take time to put your virtual legal team together and get all the team members on the same page. A few strategies can, however, help you build a more effective virtual team and boost customer experience in a great way. The good news is that once an effective virtual legal team is established and managed well, you can get all the services at a fraction of the actual cost.

The Top Business Lawyers Mean Business

The law also protects consumers from business monopolies, malpractices, price fixing, and other issues.

As a business owner, you need to know about the laws regarding your business type, whether it is a small venture, a franchise, a partnership, or a corporation. There exist several legal considerations. The choices you make while setting up a business influence your business management, operations, finances, taxes, profits, and liabilities in the long run.

The importance of hiring business lawyers

Business lawyers know business laws inside out. They can help you right from the day you have a “blueprint” of your business plan to the day your business roars in the market… and even afterwards.

They can assist you in:

· Buying and selling ventures

· Mergers & acquisitions

· Starting LLC, corporation, and others

· Creating shareholder agreements

· Preparing business contracts

· Creating business plans

· Mediating disputes between you and consumers or business contract breaches

· Preparing and evaluating financial documents

· Collecting debts

· Issuance of stock

· Filing for bankruptcy

A clear idea of business law

A competent business attorney helps you give a picture of business law which would be clear as a crystal. He or she will explain the tax implications, business responsibility, and benefits of each kind of entity. This aids you in setting up an entity that benefits you, your employees, shareholders, and consumers.

Business lawyers harbor meaningful connections with important sources in the business community. Their objective is to promote a healthy business community that features continuous growth.

Of course, you can set up a business on your own, but you still need a lawyer. Only lawyers can give you legal advice. They are authorized and capable of doing so.

A partially-trained lawyer or a layman who claims to know the law may give you poor advice. They are not as acclimatized with legal situations as competent lawyers are. Qualified business lawyers are recognized by the Court of Appeals, which is the highest court of the state. They abide by a code of conduct and display sheer professionalism when handling cases. They are always updated about the changes in laws.

A reputable business lawyer has the legal expertise to interpret law for their clients and represent their interests in the courtroom and outside. You can benefit a lot from hiring such a lawyer. In other words, he or she can make things easier for you in the legal world.

Thanks to reputable law firms going online, it is easy to contact the best lawyer in town. You can schedule an initial consultation with him or her. You can discuss with them about your dream venture. It is time to put your idea on legal papers and out in the market.

Limits of Human Laws

The evolution of man necessitates that he form communities where he can live in relation with his neighbors. And since human beings are of varied in nature, it became pertinent that each community must organize itself to take care of both the weak and strong, and therefore a legal system gradually evolved in each society based on the spiritual maturity of the people. But the more mankind fell from grace, the more removed the laws became from natural laws that govern all creation. Thus it is that these laws became so different from one community to the other, that what is unlawful in one country may be accepted in the next country.

This was possible because man, in his evolution, succumbed to the Lucifer principle of letting himself go, where they try to accommodate their weakness in their mundane laws. But in actual sense, there ought to be one law in existence, the law of nature, which, if all people chose to follow it, could manifest differently in different parts of the world based on the spiritual maturity of the people involved. But the intellect insists on discrepancy in the legal system, where arbitrariness rules. For example, the natural laws insist that whatever a man sows, that shall he reap. This the legal system ought to have followed up in their administration of justice, but it is not so. This is partly their fault and partly not their fault.

Take an example. A man commits murder. He is arrested and brought to court. Every evidence, real and circumstantial, points to his guilt. The judge has no option than to find him guilty and sentence him to death. But in actual sense, the Judge does not have all the facts. For one, the murderer is only an executor and not the originator. All over the world, far away from the seat of justice, people who have experienced similar issues like the ones that provoked the murderer may have wished their victims murdered silently. All these wishes rises up as thoughts to a power center where they are intensified. The murderer happens to be the person who was just in a position to execute his own action. So he drew strength from the power center and physically carried out the deed.Every other person involved in the thought are also guilty. But because we believe that thoughts are free, they cannot be tried. But in the eyes of Natural laws-some would say eyes of the Creator, it is one and the same-they are guilty and must reap what they have sown according to the Law of sowing and reaping.

4 Easy Steps to Value an Estate

When someone passes away, if they left a Will they will have nominated an executor (if they didn’t leave a Will the next of kin will be able to deal with the estate). It is the executor’s job to sort out the assets and liabilities of the deceased. In a nutshell, this means getting in the assets and paying/discharging the liabilities.

But before you can do this you will need to value the estate. This means valuing any money, property, and possessions belonging to the person who has passed away. This valuation will be used to determine if inheritance tax needs to be paid or not. In this article, we will be outlining the four steps you need to take to value an estate.

Step One

Get the details.

To work out the value of the estate, you will need details of all assets e.g. bank accounts, savings accounts, property, etc. You will need details of all debts e.g. utility bills, loan repayments, mortgages, etc. and all significant gifts they gave away in the last seven years before they died. This means you will have to write to the asset holders and ask them for the value of the asset at the date of death. You are trying to ascertain the value of the estate at the date the deceased person passed away. This is an important point as some assets will increase in value, e.g., a bank account gaining interest.

Money in a joint bank account or owned jointly will automatically pass to the other owner or owners, half of the money will need to be added into the calculation for the estate.

Tip: To value non-monetary assets (cars, antiques, etc.) it is recommended that you use a professional valuer if the asset is worth more than £500.00. If the deceased left a lot of belongings such as furniture, jewellery, etc. you can hire a professional valuer who will value everything at once and provide you with a succinct report.

Tip: You will need to get three valuations of any houses from three different estate agents and then use the average to give you a figure for the property.

Step Two

Total up the assets and the debts. Add all of the assets together to reach the total asset figure and total up all of the debts to reach the total debt figure.

To find the value of the estate, you will need to subtract the debts from the assets. Take the total debt figure away from the total asset figure to be left with the final value of the estate.

Assets – Debts = Estate value.

If the estate value is over £325,000.00 then usually you will need to pay inheritance tax. For more information on when and how to pay inheritance tax.

Step Three

Regardless of whether or not you need to pay inheritance tax if you need a grant of representation you should fill out the right inheritance tax form. This needs to be completed to obtain the Grant.

If there is no inheritance tax to pay, but you need a grant, then you need to fill out form IHT205. If there is any tax to pay you will need form IHT400.

Step Four

Send in the forms when you apply for the grant of representation. You should send your application to your local Probate Registry.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are four simple steps to follow to value an estate. However, just because the steps are simple does not mean the process will be easy.

5 Easy Steps To Obtain a Grant of Probate

When disposing of an estate, you will sometimes need to obtain a document called a Grant of Probate, or, depending on the situation Letters of Administration. If needed, this document is an official statement to asset and debt holders, informing them that you are the executor in charge of distributing the assets and paying off the debts. It allows them to communicate with you, safe in the knowledge that they are resolving the estate with the designated representative.

You will need to apply for, and obtain a Grant if the value of the deceased’s estate exceeds £5,000.00 or if there is property, such as a house, to dispose of. Banks, building societies and other asset holders can, at their discretion, ask to see a Grant regardless of the value of the asset they hold.

That being said, you are unlikely to need a grant if the estate is passing to a surviving spouse, or if the assets are held in joint names and are passing to the joint owner.

Once you have established whether or not you need to obtain a Grant, you will need to follow the below steps to successfully obtain the Grant.

Step One

Your first step will be to work out the value of the estate. In the simplest terms, you will do this by adding together the estate’s assets and subtracting the estate’s debts.

The asset holders will inform you of the value of each of the assets at the time of death. You need to enter these figures into the Inheritance Tax form, and this will calculate the value of the estate.

You must do this even if the Estate is below the Inheritance Tax Threshold.

Step Two

Complete an Inheritance Tax form either IHT205 or IHT400.

To know which form you need to fill out you need to understand the differences between the forms. Form IHT205 is the form that you need to fill out if there is no inheritance tax to be paid, either because the estate is too low in value or because the estate is an exempted estate.

The IHT400 is the form that is filled out when there is inheritance tax to be paid. However, there will be some situations where there is no inheritance tax to be paid, and the IHT400 will still be the form you need to fill out so you need to be careful and assess the estate in detail. if you are unsure then start filling in IHT205 and it will guide you to form IHT400 if it is needed.

If you think that there is no inheritance tax due on the estate then you should start filling out IHT205, you may soon find however that you will need to change to form IHT400.

Step Three

Complete a probatePA1 application form.

To complete this form, you will need to know the basic details of the person who has died, e.g.: their first name & surname, date of birth, date of death, and marital status. You will also need to know some more specific information e.g.: did the deceased own any assets under another name, was the deceased adopted.

You will have to fill in questions about the Will if one exists. As well as any information on any foreign held assets e.g.: did the deceased own a holiday home abroad.

Section five of this form discusses the relatives of the deceased. Section six is a section where you provide your details.

Section seven is where you provide details of any inheritance tax owed by the estate. You can get these figures from the inheritance tax forms completed at Step Two.

Section eight applies to those who are applying on behalf of someone who has been nominated as an executor but has lost capacity. You will need to provide details of the person you are applying on behalf of.

Section nine is a helpful checklist that allows you to make sure that you have completed all of the forms and enclosed all of the necessary documents. Following this checklist means that your application is far more likely to be accepted.

Step Four

Swear an oath. You can obtain an oath from the probate registry or draft one yourself, although if you choose this, then you need to be careful as an oath will only be valid in certain formats.

Swearing the oath will not take long, you will need to swear it in front of a solicitor or a local probate office, and this will cost approximately £5.00.

Step Five

Send your application to the probate registry.

You should include:

  • The probate application form PA1,
  • The Inheritance Tax form, an official copy of the death certificate,
  • The Oath,
  • The original will and three copies – and any codicils,
  • The application fee of £215 – a cheque made payable to HM Courts and Tribunals Service (there’s no fee if the estate is under £5,000.00).

How to Settle a Court Case

“Money makes the world spin”. It’s a phrase that we all know very well. Credit cards, alimony, child-support, mortgages, student loans, business loans,… with a current 19 Trillion debt, the United States and its citizens are buried in financial problems. But, there is one thing that most of these aforementioned debts have in common, they can usually be mitigated with “settlements” and/or negotiations. However, in this article I will focus on basic lawsuits and criminal cases.

When we hear the word, “Settlement”, images of money are immediately conjured into our minds. Most of the settlements we hear about in the media are for large sums, anywhere from $50K to millions of dollars, often involving celebrities or powerful business moguls. Many people might ask, “If a party knows they are innocent, then why would they agree to settle the case?”

People settle cases for all kinds of reasons:

1. Save on lawyer expenses
2. Avoid public attention
3. Reduce stress/Time in court
4. Reduce risks of harsher sanctions from potentially losing in a trial.

Defendants often settle criminal cases for “plea” bargains. (An admittance of guilt in exchange for a lighter punishment) for similar reasons that defendants agree to settle in civil cases.

Nobody likes being in court! It is costly, time consuming, stressful and can be somewhat intimidating. Whether you are being sued for a credit card debt or facing criminal charges, the potential of being garnished, put in jail, missing time away from work and family, the presence of armed guards, black robed judges, etc… the entire process can be a bit frightening, especially for those who do not spend much time in the courts. (Which is usually most people unless you are a legal professional, police officer, or a habitual criminal.)

When we decide to settle a case, we have to weigh our options. Defendants and Plaintiffs settle for the same reasons believe it or not. If a defendant believes he has a weak defense or is simply fed up with the court process, he is likely to settle, if a plaintiff believes he has a weak argument or he is fed up with the court process, he is likely to settle. Time is money, and people do not like to have their’s wasted!

In essence, settlements happen when people come to a conclusion after assessing in their minds a “cost-benefit-analysis”. Let us take a look at the perspective from a defendant and plaintiff’s point of view in a hypothetical discrimination case.

John sues Corporation-Z for racial discrimination. John has several witnesses who have agreed to testify. Corporation-Z learns that these witnesses with be participating. Corporation-Z believes that John has a good chance at defeating them in court. Corp-Z offers John $10,000 to settle the case out of court. If John were to win the case in court, he would probably sue for much more in damages, however, if John takes the offer, he can save himself attorney fees and months (possibly years) going to court cases.

Although Corp-Z is in a disadvantageous position, they are well-funded and will be able to drag the case on for a long time. John is a simple 9 to 5 employee with very little resources. However, John feels that he has strong evidence and is unwilling to settle for $10,000, he refuses the offer and decides to see it through to the end. Corp-Z offers another amount for $15,000, John still refuses.

Corp-Z files several continuances to drag out the case. John is getting tired.

John later finds out that several of his key witnesses have decided not to testify. John is now getting worried. Corp-Z has not yet learned that the witnesses have backed out. The next court date is in 6 weeks. John must act fast! Due to these new circumstances, his chances to win the case have gotten much lower.

At this point, John has several options:

Contact the defendant and accept their $15,000 settlement offer.
Send the defendant one last counter offer for a higher amount before agreeing to settle.
Rebuild his case, look for new evidence, take the case to trial and potentially win big or end up with nothing if he loses.

Option 1 is the safest- Defendants and Plaintiffs have the option to offer and/or withdraw settlement offers at ANY TIME. In this scenario, the defendant, Corp-Z is likely to accept to settle unless new evidence has been obtained.

Option 2 is a little risky- In this situation, John has learned that his witnesses are refusing to testify. Corp-Z has not yet found out, however, if they do find out, they are very likely to withdraw any offers to settle, as they will be likely to defeat the suit. John can attempt to negotiate one last time to get a higher amount from the defendant, but it will take some time to sort out the particulars, and time is something John doesn’t have with a looming court date. The closer the trial date gets, the more likely the defendant is to find out about the witnesses backing out.

Option 3 is highly risky- If the case goes to a trial by jury and John has other evidence besides witness testimony, the jury could still see it his way. If his witnesses are his key pieces of evidence, then he is at high risk for losing. This option would require very careful consideration. If John wins the case through jury, he will likely receive a huge pay-out, if he loses the case, he could end up losing everything or even end up being counter-sued by Corporation-Z.

Factors to consider:

Is John poor? How bad does he need money? If he loses the case, will he still be financially sound? Is he looking for justice or a pay-out? What are his goals in this lawsuit? Is he mentally and emotionally prepared to stay in court for several more months? These are questions John has to ask himself before making a decision on how to proceed.

From the Defendant’s perspective:

Corporation-Z is a business and they have a business to run. Handling these legal matters are a huge cost and burden on the operation. Negative publicity can also hurt the business extensively. Even if Corporation-Z discovers that the plaintiff, John, has lost his key witnesses, it still may be beneficial for Corporation-Z to settle. Typically, when settlements occur, non-disclosure agreements must be signed stating that the allegations against the company cannot be publicly discussed. If Corp-Z refuses to settle and defeats John, John may still end up retaining his right to discuss the trial and his allegations to public organizations causing bad press not to mention the extra legal fees it may take to try and sue John later for defamation.

In this situation, if Corp-Z discovers that John has lost his witnesses, Corp-Z can agree to settle, for the same amount previously offered or for a lower amount, (since Z now has bargaining power!) or Corp-Z can withdraw all offers and attempt to win in trial.

Corporate attorneys are famous for their slogan to, “Always settle, settle, settle”.

While Corporation-Z has a good chance at defeating John, they may end up spending triple the amount of their settlement offer attempting to defeat the suit, also, Corporation-Z isn’t fully aware if John has any other additional evidence that is not yet known. Victory is not always guaranteed. In court, just as in a boxing match, the ability to appear weak when one is strong, and the ability to appear strong when one is weak, is very crucial in the negotiation process of settling a case.

Timing:

Losing a lawsuit that goes to trial can result in dire consequences.

Income garnishments
Loss of employment as a result of being garnished by multiple entities
Loss of public reputation
property being seized
injunctions being placed against yourself or your business
liens being places on your assets
Tax refunds being withheld
Negative credit score
(These are just a few examples)

Some may be tempted to file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy in light of being sued for a debt, however, I wouldn’t recommend doing so unless your debts exceed $10,000. I’ll save that discussion for another article.

Timing is very critical when it comes to successfully mitigating a civil or criminal case. Let’s say you owe a credit card company $10,000. Typically, after you default on your loan for more than 90 days, the credit card company will likely sell your debt to a third party collector. A few months to a year later, you are likely to be served with a warrant stating that you are being sued for the amount by the third party debt collector who purchased the debt for pennies on the dollar.

Once the lawsuit is filed, the creditor now has the upper-hand. Since you have essentially ignored all attempts to collect, it is assumed that you are avoiding the debt and do not have the means to pay it back. A smarter decision would have been to inquire about hardship programs or attempt to settle the debt with a partial amount before you were sued. (Always get everything in writing). However, since things have escalated to a court hearing, the creditor now probably believes that they have a great chance to win the case.

When most people owe a debt, they stick their heads in the sand and do nothing. If you are sued for a credit card debt, your goal now is to re-establish your bargaining power! Even if you owe the debt, make them prove it! File an answer to the lawsuit, file a discovery request, ask for continuances! ( I can help you do these things by offering a template to follow.) Once the creditor sees that you aren’t going to be like the other 99% of people who don’t show up to court and allow for a default judgement, the creditor will be likely willing to settle the debt for a fraction of what they are suing you for.

While you are fighting the lawsuit, whether your intention is to get it dismissed through lack of evidence,lack of itemization or your goal is to settle the debt for a lesser amount, you must act swiftly! If you do intend to settle the debt, be sure to make the number attractive but not too high. If you owe $10,000, offer them 30%, because they are likely to counter back asking for 50%.

If the creditor is not willing to settle and/or you lose the case, enroll in a “slow-pay” program. That’s right! If you lose a lawsuit, you can enroll in a “slow-pay” program whereas you may only be paying $20 a month or so to the creditor. (Albeit for a very long time!). Through the slow-pay process, you can pay with a check or money order. In order for the plaintiff (or creditor) to garnish your wages, they have to get an approved garnishment order from a court. If you miss a single-payment through the slow-pay program, some jurisdictions automatically issue a garnishment order because of your lack of ability to keep your promise to pay.

Federal law protects workers from being fired if they are being garnished by a single entity. However, if two or more entities are garnishing you, federal law allows employers to fire you because of the administrative burden your garnishment orders are costing to the company you work for.

Any legal case must be taken seriously whether it be criminal or civil. Even traffic court can cost us! If you ignore a traffic ticket, don’t be surprised if you later find out that your drivers license has been revoked! Reinstating a revoked license is time consuming and can cost hundreds, even thousands, depending on the liens placed upon the license.

In many criminal cases, district attorneys will offer “plea deals”. This “deal” is basically where you agree to admit guilt in exchange for a lighter punishment. Plea deals can benefit both parties. The district attorney meets his conviction quota, you receive a lighter sentence than you would if you lost your trial, and the process of court is sped up.

Going back to the lessons we learned earlier about, “Appearing strong when you are weak, and to be weak when you are strong”, accepting plea deals is an art within itself just as accepting settlements are.

Example:

John is accused of stealing a car. John maintains that he is innocent.

John’s witnesses didn’t show up to court.

The state offers him a plea deal. Admit guilt and you will only face 6 months in jail.

John refuses! The trial continues

The state is having a hard time presenting evidence against John.

The state offers a new plea deal.

“1 month in jail with 6 months probation.”

John again refuses and demands a jury.

The jury hears John’s defense and the state’s allegations against him.

The jury decides that John is guilty! John will be sentenced to 3 years in prison.

John should have taken the plea deal!

Now, this is a worse case scenario! Just as in our lawsuit example earlier with, “Corporation-Z”, many factors come into play.

Let us replay the scenario. This time, John has several alibis and video surveillance of the vehicle being stolen that he managed to find on the internet. The video is low-quality but the suspect appears to have red-hair, John has brown hair!

John challenges the state’s claim. The state claims that John merely dyed his hair brown and his alibis are lying about where he was during the alleged carjacking!

John is confident in his defense and refuses all plea deals.

The jury finds John innocent!

Had John taken a plea deal, he would have ruined his record and served time for a crime he never committed! However, the jury could have still convicted him. No matter how confident you feel in your case, always prepare for the unexpected and don’t be afraid to appeal if necessary to buy yourself more time.

When to refuse a plea deal or when to take one, is no different than debating on whether or not to take a settlement. Many innocent men and women have taken plea deals for crimes they didn’t commit on the advice of their attorney who advised their client that the evidence is just too strong against them; even though they maintain their innocence.

Some defendants value their honor so much, that they resolve to never take a plea deal regardless of the consequences, whereas others make informed decisions in an effort to preserve themselves. In law, there is no “black or white”, “right or wrong” choice. Everything is about weighing risks vs rewards. Every situation is completely different.

Why You Should Have a Corporate Lawyer on Staff

Corporations and small businesses are sites of expertise in their own industries. Business executives are highly specialized professionals whose primary focus is on the efficient and profitable management of their businesses. These professionals should be able to devote their time and energy to that purpose-not to worrying about legal issues large and small for their companies. If you are managing a corporation or small business, you should seriously consider keeping a lawyer on retainer or as in-house staff to help you navigate legal matters. Below are a few of the reasons that you should retain a dedicated lawyer who is familiar with your business.

Contracts and other business agreements

Whatever your business, chances are good that you routinely enter and execute contracts with a variety of parties. Typical corporate contracts include sales contracts, leases (real estate and otherwise), supply agreements, and partnership or corporate structure documents. The consequences can be severe if one of these agreements contains an unfavorable or unenforceable provision. While your business staff may be skilled negotiators, a lawyer can review these documents to help protect your company from litigation or other negative effects from unenforceable contracts.

The human resources minefield

Employment law is a complex area of law with radically different requirements for different types of businesses and employees. A general counsel can assist you and your human resources staff with common legal issues surrounding employee leave, benefits, and hiring practices.

Regulatory compliance

Depending on the nature of your business, you may be subject to various regulatory requirements at the local, state, and federal levels. Examples include securities regulation, environmental regulation, campaign finance/political regulation, and intellectual property filings. Since regulatory infractions can result in substantial fines, it is important to remain on top of these ever changing rules. A lawyer can help you identify relevant requirements and complete any necessary filings or reports to the government.

Tax counseling

Your tax liability and responsibility depends in part on the corporate structure of your company. While you should use a certified accountant for tax preparation, a lawyer can assist you with tax planning and counseling to help you minimize your overall tax burden. A lawyer can even help you structure your business at the outset in a way that reduces tax liability.

Litigation and crisis management

While the other examples have concerned mainly “chronic” legal issues, having a lawyer on staff can also help you in case of “acute” legal issues such as civil or criminal litigation or government investigation. In addition to drafting pleadings, a lawyer can assist you with settlement negotiations.

Since these legal matters can be incredibly time-consuming, maintaining a lawyer on staff ensures that your company devotes the proper attention to legal obligations while your business professionals remain focused on the business itself. You can retain outside counsel from a firm that has experience across each of these areas, or you can hire in-house counsel as an employee of the business itself. Whatever option you choose, you can rest assured that a trained lawyer will minimize your business liability and ultimately save your company money in the long run.